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Powell's School Church of England (VA) Primary School

Geography  

At Powell’s School, Geography follows the 2014 National Curriculum requirements. We believe that children are naturally curious and encourage them to ask questions about their learning, the world around them, and the people who inhabit different places.  To achieve this, we ensure that the children’s learning develops their contextual knowledge as well as geographical skills.  All our topics have an overarching question to inspire the children, and provide a rich and stimulating curriculum for all children. We ensure that there is continuity and progression in terms of subject knowledge, skills application and the development of appropriate attitudes and values. The children are also encouraged to make links to other topics for example religion, culture and beliefs.  Making links helps the children gain a better sense of the world around them

In KS1, the children begin to learn about the location of the continents and oceans; as well as the location of the countries of the United Kingdom and their capital cities. The context of their learning focuses on local areas, around school and the town of Cirencester, as well as other places in the UK.

During KS2, the children expand their knowledge and understanding, by looking at more distant places around the world including; Europe, North and South America. Their learning focuses not only on the human aspects of our planet; but also on the physical and environmental aspects as well.

All children have access to outdoor learning in geography, using our school grounds and the local area, as well as trips further afield and as part of some of our residential trips. 

              

 Geography progression of skills

Locational knowledge Human and Physical knowledge

Geography skills and

field work

Early Years
To know about similarities and difference in relation to places, objects.

Talk about the features of their own immediate environment.

Talk about how environments might vary

Know that the environment and living things are influenced by human activity.

Make observations in the environment, explaining why some things occur, and why changes take place.

Look for similarities, differences and patterns in change.

Locational knowledge Human and Physical knowledge

Geography skills and

field work

Year 1

Name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans.

Name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas

Identify seasonal and daily weather patterns in the United Kingdom use basic geographical vocabulary to refer to key physical features, key human features, including: city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office, port, harbour and shop.

Use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the United Kingdom and its countries.

Use simple compass directions (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language [for example, near and far; left and right], to describe the location of features and routes on a map.

Use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features; devise a simple map; and use and construct basic symbols in a key.

Use simple fieldwork and observational skills to study the geography of their school and its grounds and the key human and physical features of its surrounding environment.

Locational knowledge Human and Physical knowledge

Geography skills and

field work

Year 2

Name and locate the world’s seven continents and five oceans.

Name, locate and identify characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas.

Understand geographical similarities and differences through studying the human and physical geography of a small area of the United Kingdom, and of a small area in a contrasting non-European country.

Use world maps, atlases and globes to identify the United Kingdom and its countries, as well as the countries, continents and oceans studied at this key stage.

Use simple compass directions (North, South, East and West) and locational and directional language [for example, near and far; left and right], to describe the location of features and routes on a map.

Use aerial photographs and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic human and physical features; devise a simple map; and use and construct basic symbols in a key. 

Locational knowledge Human and Physical knowledge

Geography skills and

field work

Year 3

Locate the world’s countries, using maps including North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities.

Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns;

Understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.

Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night)

Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region within North or South America

Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied.

Use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.

Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Locational knowledge Human and Physical knowledge

Geography skills and

field work

Year 4

Locate the world’s countries, using maps including North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities.

Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns; 

Understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.

Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night)

Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region within North or South America.

Describe and understand key aspects of: physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, and the water cycle human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.

Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied.

Use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.

 

Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Locational knowledge Human and Physical knowledge

Geography skills and

field work

Year 5

Locate the world’s countries, using maps including North and South America, concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities.

Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns;

Understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.

Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night)

Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region within North or South America.

Describe and understand key aspects of: physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, and the water cycle human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.

 

Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied.

Use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.

Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and

digital technologies.

Locational knowledge Human and Physical knowledge

Geography skills and

field work

Year 6

Locate the world’s countries, using maps including the location of Russia concentrating on their environmental regions, key physical and human characteristics, countries, and major cities.

 

Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom, geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, key topographical features (including hills, mountains, coasts and rivers), and land-use patterns;

Understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.

Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night)

Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of human and physical geography of a region of the United Kingdom, a region in a European country. 

 

Describe and understand key aspects of: physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.

Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features studied. 

 

Use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build their knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world. 

 

Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods, including sketch maps, plans and graphs, and digital technologies.

Please click the titles below to see our - 

Progression Geography

Working as a Geographer

Geography Quality Mark Award information